Written warnings

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Written warnings are often issued if competition law, trademark law or copyrights are violated. They can be issued against tradesmen, entrepreneurs and even private people. The purpose of a written warning is to prevent a dispute in court. If the party being warned does not respond to the written warning, the party issuing the warning will generally apply for a court order.

Tip:
You should always respond within the (often very short) period specified in the written warning. Otherwise, it is highly likely that you will receive mail from the court shortly thereafter.

There are many ways to respond to a written warning. This depends on various factors. The first question to ask when determining the correct procedure is always whether the written warning is justified from a legal point of view.

We have the expertise to answer this question for you. We will review your written warning and give you a realistic assessment of the prospects of success in a defence. There is good reason for doing this. Often written warnings have errors of form. A legal situation is also sometimes clearly stated although it may not apply to your individual case at all. In addition, the pre-formulated cease-and-desist declarations and declarations of obligations are frequently worded too broadly and amounts in dispute for calculating attorneys fees are too high. In particular in so-called mass warnings, horrendous (attorneys) fees are demanded which are necessary to review.

Place your trust in us before you sign something without reflection and out of fear. You are committed to cease-and-desist declarations and declarations of obligations for more than 30 years.

Important:
Your first telephonic contact with us is free of charge. If the court defence against the written warning is successful, the opposing party bears the costs of our services.

Contact us now!